This week, the U.K. Supreme Court is reviewing the cases of Alison Sharland and Varsha Gohil to determine whether a spouse can reopen a divorce case in instances of fraud or misrepresentation after the parties have reached a settlement agreement.

Reopening divorce cases in instances of fraudSharland contends that her husband misled her into believing that his software company was worth

In an unusual move for a divorce case, a Queens judge added Benny Tal’s business partners as defendants in Benny’s divorce action because the three men had colluded to hide Benny’s assets from his wife Michal.  As Michal told the New York Post, “It’s like a dirty soap opera. There’s so much fraud going

You wouldn’t think old bankruptcies are a place worth checking when hunting for assets. If someone’s bankrupt, it means they are essentially out of money, right?

Wrong, at least sometimes.

We have found all kinds of wonderful material when looking at bankruptcies. Some of it leads right to assets, and some leads to a non-financial

Although a no-brainer when it comes to contemplating divorce, it’s remarkable how often couples forget about old bank accounts they thought had been emptied and closed, but turn out to be active and full of money.

This happened recently to one of our clients, who discovered a major cash purchase made by his wife when

Grandchildren of the late Judge Leander Perez, a segregationist political boss who ruled Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana from the twenties until his death in 1968, recently filed a so-called “legacy lawsuit” against several large oil companies for allegedly polluting land on which the family held mineral rights.  The glaring problem with the plaintiffs’ case is that

A London judge has ordered oil trader Michael Prest to pay his wife over $600,000 in support and alimony payments or face jail time.  Prest’s case gained attention last year for a landmark U.K. Supreme Court ruling permitting Yasmin Prest to pierce the corporate veil to reach assets that Michael had placed in trusts held

Back in January, we posted a story about a Canadian investigative company whose owners, Michael Grontis, Cullen Johnson, and Elaine White, had fleeced their customers out of millions by promising to find assets hidden in offshore accounts.  Instead, they created fraudulent bank records and passed them off as real.  These crooked investigators’ work has surfaced

San Francisco area divorce attorney Mary Nolan was sentenced last week to two years in federal prison on multiple felony charges, including illegal wiretapping and tax evasion.  Her crimes included hiring private investigator Christopher Butler to use dirty tactics to gather incriminating evidence against her clients’ husbands.

At Nolan’s direction, Butler planted listening devices in