As Bitcoin surges in value once again, divorcing spouses may be tempted to convert cash into electronic currency. Finding it can be harder than finding cash, but if you do find it, you can make a comparatively fast case that your spouse is undercounting assets.

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Clients who hire us for asset searches always want to know what we find. As often as not, the big news after an asset search is when we don’t find something we should be seeing but are not.

When someone is concealing the truth, they often put in place a lie to throw you off.

What’s wrong with using a forensic accountant in your hunt for a spouse’s hidden assets? Nothing, provided you hand that accountant all the pertinent information you can. We’ve mentioned the need for these professionals frequently on our site, and this Forbes article by Jeffrey Landers explains similar reasoning.forensic accountant divorce

The problem with forensic accountants can be

You wouldn’t think old bankruptcies are a place worth checking when hunting for assets. If someone’s bankrupt, it means they are essentially out of money, right?

Wrong, at least sometimes.

We have found all kinds of wonderful material when looking at bankruptcies. Some of it leads right to assets, and some leads to a non-financial

In a country in which people can form a company in minutes over the internet, it’s amazing to us how many asset searches proceed on the basis that you only need to look for property owned directly by a person.

So often, we find that someone can truthfully state at a deposition that he owns

San Francisco area divorce attorney Mary Nolan was sentenced last week to two years in federal prison on multiple felony charges, including illegal wiretapping and tax evasion.  Her crimes included hiring private investigator Christopher Butler to use dirty tactics to gather incriminating evidence against her clients’ husbands.

At Nolan’s direction, Butler planted listening devices in